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This is a game I use quite often when explaining basic circuitry to school students. Each student gets assigned a component from an electrical circuit, then gets to his position and waits for his/her turn to reenact his part in an electrical circuit. I will give an example of reenacting a simple switch circuit. It is a nice example to make students feel what polarity and DC means, and what is happening inside a circuit. Roles: – one Battery – one LED – Switch – Electrons (the rest of the students) Materials: – labels for each role (you can use…

ohmBracelet

by Irene Posch and Hannah Perner-Wilson A wearable tool for visualizing electrical resistance. A quick way to visualize contact (continuity) in a digital sensor or conductive material, or change in resistance in an analog sensor or resistive material. As a newcomer to the wold of electronics, how difficult it can be to grasp the idea of electrical resistance wehen electricity is something we can not see? As an e-textile practitioner, how many times a day to you measure resistance? The eTextiles Tester Bracelet allows for easy continuity testing. Build a simple circuit with an LED, a coin-cell battery pouch and interrupt the full circuit connection by…

mouse

DIY speakers made with e-textiles never cease to amaze me. There is something magical about feeling the vibrations and hearing the (tinny) sounds via an everyday material such as fabric or paper. I also love the way that this demonstrates a materiality of sound in a tangible way. The basic principle is to make an electromagnet. Flow of electricity creates an electromagnet in conductive traces (such as copper thread or tape). Coiling makes this electromagnet stronger (also, the larger the coil, the larger the magnetic field). Attach this to a LM386 amp (or other amp, this is just the one…

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I thought it would be useful to have an insight into some of the ideas that people working with e-textiles are exploring. This reader is made up of extracts, thoughts, contexts, ideas, and future imaginings from people at the e-textile summer camp 2019. You can down load the PDF and bind your own (see diagram for simple binding technique, but staples are also good if you are short for time). The publication can be read in a number of ways. I have been inspired by the “Parasitic Reading Room” led by Teresa Dillon (2018-19), which is a way to read…

I would like to do something around “unteaching e-textiles”. Dealing with fashion students now, I am coming across preconceptions around “e-textiles as style” and with this a resistance to explore their material potential. I haven’t figured out yet how to successfully unteach these, but would like to do something around “back to the raw materials” to encourage quick and dirty conductivity, and demystify the impression of “high-tech” and “smart”. Each sample would be paired with a brief intro of the material / molecular structure / history / chemical reaction / whatever is relevant. Sample 1: Graphene – sticky tape method…

Material

A probe to make good contact with textile without harming it. The Pin Probe is probe to electrically connect (to) conductive fabric or thread. The probe consists of a pin to make temporary but firm contact with textile materials without harming them. A soft and flexible textile cable then connects the probe at the other side also to a pin – or can connect to any other suitable plug, like a banana plug to connect to a multimeter, or a clip probe, among others. This swatch shows how to add a pin to a textile cord to make a Pin…

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The swatch explores how you can create customised 3d printed LED diffusers interlocking with felt, leather and neoprene.   Create your LED diffuser easily interlocking with textiles This collection of LED light diffusers is composed by five ready-to-3Dprint and two 3D templates to be customised adding a top in your favourite 3D application. The diffusers are designed to easily interlock with three types of textiles with different thickness like felt, neoprene and leather. Download and print or customise file https://tinyurl.com/LedDiffuserCollection https://tinyurl.com/3dleddiffuser Material PLA

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INTRO: How to use an 3V LED on the 1.5V of an AA battery? A Joule thief is a so called “boost” circuit. By cleverly using a fast switch – the transistor – in combination with a coil – using induction effects – it is possible to make 3Volt from the 1.5 Volt of an AAA or AA battery. Just the voltage an LED needs. Of course – there is no free energy. Either 1.5V all the time, or say, 3V half of the time. Components: Coil – we make it ourself! Winding two wires around a ferrite ring. Transistor: NPN, for example BC457c…

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Intro A LED is just a pint of light. Reflecting this light is making it more magical.  If the reflecting surface is not straight but curved or even moves, the effects are even becoming “alive”. So fabric or skin is ideal. In this swatch we make a folding of fabric and make a sequence of LED’s shine inside this folding. The pattern will become dynamic with a micro-controller. The electronics is at the back side of the fabric, the LED’s are sticking through the fabric and are visible at the front side the folding. This swatch could become a test for reflexion…

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Intro Using fabric the light of the LED or Neopixel is filtered, softened. All transparent or semi transparent materials can be used to obtain special effects from LED’s. The distance between the LED and the material matters, so in this case filler was used. Using a programmable RGB  LED- provides even more effects – changing the color and the intensity, depending on context. The neopixel is easy to program, and can be chained to other neopixel – LED’s to make strings. This fabric light bulb can run on an 3V coin cell battery, and with the small ATtiny85 this set is…

Pressure matrix illustrations

Translating RESISTANCE to VOLTAGE using a VOLTAGE DIVIDER!

Using thermochromic pigment to see and understand how resistance in a material becomes heat and how it spreads through different materials.