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Credits: Meg Grant

Year of Invention: 2014

Description: One of the tasks of a good pattern-maker is to optimize pattern piece layout to reduce waste.  If you loved playing Tetris, you will love pattern layout!  In the garment industry, a few centimeters can translate to measurable savings when scaled up for production.

Over the last decade or so, a small but exciting movement called Zero-waste has grown among apparel designers.  The off-cuts, selvedge edges and “negative space” of pattern layout are often used decoratively in zero-waste design, but the most exciting part is when the geometry of flat pattern pieces are designed to fit together to eliminate negative space (waste) altogether.  This principle is even more important when we are using textiles plated with heavy metals that we want to keep out of the waste stream.

This pressure sensor, made by sandwiching a piece of pressure-sensitive film between two conductive surfaces, will be familiar to e-textile practitioners. It’s based on the time-honoured tradition of conductive and pressure-sensitive resistive materials, shown in Plusea’s Conductive Fabric Pressure Sensor Instructable.  The connector on this sensor has three pins, but only the outside two are active.

Materials: Conductive fabric, pressure-sensitive film, non-woven and woven fabrics, clincher connector.

Techniques: Laser cutting, heat-bonding, sewing

References/Inspirations: Zero-waste Fashion Design, Tetris

Dimensions: 105mm x 23mm

Link: http://meggrant.com/zero-waste-swatch.php

Photo:

zero-waste-swatch

 

Pattern diagram for 32 pressure sensors:

pressure sensor pattern layout

Pattern pieces cut from conductive textile.  Shaded area shows pattern pieces for a single sensor.  The outer edges extend beyond the edges of the textile.

 

pressure sensor pattern piece placment

Conductive pattern pieces positioned on the fabric of the sensor make up the circuit.

 

pressure sensor fold to complete

The circuit is folded over pressure-sensitive or piezo-resistive textile to form the sensor.  Sides are stitched closed and ends are terminated.


1 Comment so far

  1. Sustainable eTextiles | on June 11th, 2015

    […] Zero Waste Designs…. Meg Grant’s Swatch submission this year is a Zero-Waste Pressure sensor! […]

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